dacookiesrmine:

sparklywizard-in-a-box:

sovereigncephalopod:

misha-let-me-touch-your-assbutt:

dinosaurs-daleks-and-detectives:

I love how tumblr is so hell bent on their being a Marauders movie they will probably end up making it themselves

wow this is scarily well done

BEST ONE BEST ONE BEST ONE

YOUNG SNAPE THO

(Source: bowberry, via getoffthisplanet26)

"When you’re writing fiction, everybody thinks you’re secretly writing about real people and things. But if you write an autobiography, they think you’re lying. As one does."

— Margaret Atwood on nprbooks (via 57thstreetbooks)

(via asfadedasmyjeans)

mightyhealthyquest:

IT’S ALWAYS TEA TIME!

(via getoffthisplanet26)

minimrmn:

Shiny Cap’n

minimrmn:

Shiny Cap’n

(via sohypothetically)

dauntlesshadowhunterravenclaw:

TACO NEEDS TO KEEP HIS LITTLE MOUTH SHUT 

(Source: mykingdomforapen, via asfadedasmyjeans)

(Source: moiros1, via abookblog)

startraveller776:

huffingtonpost:

When did doing something ‘like a girl’ become an insult?

Watch the full Always commercial that seeks to answer this question.

The part that gets me is at the end of the commercial, when they ask one of the first ladies if she had a chance to do her demonstration of “running like a girl” over again, what would she do differently and she says, “I would run like myself.” I legit cried.

(via sohypothetically)

thewritingcafe:

WHAT IS NANOWRIMO?
NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It begins on November 1st of every year and goes until 11:59 on November 30th. During this time, participants must write a novel that is at least 50,000 words.
If you win NaNoWriMo, you get some perks that are listed on the website each year. Examples include discounts on writing software, free downloads, and some free physical copies of your self published book.
There is also a related event called Camp NaNoWriMo. This is the same as NaNoWriMo, but with a few differences:
Camp NaNoWriMo takes place in April and July.
On the Camp NaNoWriMo website, you can be in “cabins" with other writers where you can chat and encourage each other to write.
You can set your own word count goal for Camp NaNoWriMo.
FAQ ABOUT NANOWRIMO
Do I have to write a novel? Can I write an anthology of short stories?

While the original premise was to write a novel, you are free to write an anthology or short stories (or something similar) if you wish.

Does it have to be original fiction? Can I write fan fiction?

Again, the original premise was to write original fiction, but you can write fan fiction if you want.

Am I allowed to plan my story before November?

Yes! Writers are encouraged to prepare prior to NaNoWriMo.

Am I allowed to start writing my story before NaNoWriMo as long as I write an additional 50k words during November?

You’re supposed to start with a new story, but there’s no one to stop you from continuing an old story or even rewriting one.

Does my novel have to be 50,000 words, or can I go over?

You can definitely go over the word count.

Make sure to check the nanowrimo website for more FAQs.
PLANNING AND PREPARATION 
If you’re prone to writer’s block, I highly recommend that you plan before you write:
My Outlining and Planning Guide
Name Generators for People, Places, and Things 
Naming Characters 
Titles 
World Building 
Prepping For NaNoWriMo: The Outlining Stage
Otherwise, prepare mentally and physically for the challenge of writing a novel in a month. Plan out when you will write each day and for how long. Remember, you need at least 1667 words per day to reach the goal by the end of the month. Find a nice spot to write, have all your notes in order, and back up all your files. Here are some more tips and resources:
My Preparation Advice
Kris Noel’s Preparation Advice
Create Your Own Writer’s Retreat
Book Geek Confessions’ Prep Advice
WRITING
One thing you need to avoid during NaNoWriMo is editing. If you edit while you’re trying to write, your writing will be slowed and you’ll fall behind. Just keep writing.
Getting Started
Motivation 
Writing the Beginning 
Writing the Middle 
Writing the End
The Elephant Technique (for when you’re stuck with naming or describing something)
Finishing Your Story
Inspiration
Writing Playlists and Music
Writer’s Block
Writing Software and Websites
OTHER NANOWRIMO TIPS
10 NaNoWriMo Tips
20 Things You Should Know About NaNo
NaNo Tips
NaNoWriMo is Coming
Writer’s Digest NaNoWriMo Tips
Checklist for Nano
Lots of NaNo Tips
Word Count Widgets If You Don’t Like the NaNo Ones
AFTER NANO ENDS
So NaNoWriMo is over (or you’ve finished your novel) and now you have a rough draft of your manuscript. Here are some tips:
Do not immediately send it to an agent or publisher. Tons of people start sending out their manuscripts right after NaNoWriMo and it’s a huge mistake because they’re not sending polished, ready-to-be-published manuscripts. They’re sending rough drafts they wrote quickly.
Leave it alone before you start editing. Walk away from your manuscript and work on something else or take a break from writing. This break could be a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months. It depends on you. Then start editing once you’re fresh again.
For more on editing and publishing, see my How to Write and Publish a Novel page.

thewritingcafe:

WHAT IS NANOWRIMO?

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It begins on November 1st of every year and goes until 11:59 on November 30th. During this time, participants must write a novel that is at least 50,000 words.

If you win NaNoWriMo, you get some perks that are listed on the website each year. Examples include discounts on writing software, free downloads, and some free physical copies of your self published book.

There is also a related event called Camp NaNoWriMo. This is the same as NaNoWriMo, but with a few differences:

  • Camp NaNoWriMo takes place in April and July.
  • On the Camp NaNoWriMo website, you can be in “cabins" with other writers where you can chat and encourage each other to write.
  • You can set your own word count goal for Camp NaNoWriMo.

FAQ ABOUT NANOWRIMO

Do I have to write a novel? Can I write an anthology of short stories?

While the original premise was to write a novel, you are free to write an anthology or short stories (or something similar) if you wish.

Does it have to be original fiction? Can I write fan fiction?

Again, the original premise was to write original fiction, but you can write fan fiction if you want.

Am I allowed to plan my story before November?

Yes! Writers are encouraged to prepare prior to NaNoWriMo.

Am I allowed to start writing my story before NaNoWriMo as long as I write an additional 50k words during November?

You’re supposed to start with a new story, but there’s no one to stop you from continuing an old story or even rewriting one.

Does my novel have to be 50,000 words, or can I go over?

You can definitely go over the word count.

Make sure to check the nanowrimo website for more FAQs.

PLANNING AND PREPARATION 

If you’re prone to writer’s block, I highly recommend that you plan before you write:

Otherwise, prepare mentally and physically for the challenge of writing a novel in a month. Plan out when you will write each day and for how long. Remember, you need at least 1667 words per day to reach the goal by the end of the month. Find a nice spot to write, have all your notes in order, and back up all your files. Here are some more tips and resources:

WRITING

One thing you need to avoid during NaNoWriMo is editing. If you edit while you’re trying to write, your writing will be slowed and you’ll fall behind. Just keep writing.

OTHER NANOWRIMO TIPS

AFTER NANO ENDS

So NaNoWriMo is over (or you’ve finished your novel) and now you have a rough draft of your manuscript. Here are some tips:

  • Do not immediately send it to an agent or publisher. Tons of people start sending out their manuscripts right after NaNoWriMo and it’s a huge mistake because they’re not sending polished, ready-to-be-published manuscripts. They’re sending rough drafts they wrote quickly.
  • Leave it alone before you start editing. Walk away from your manuscript and work on something else or take a break from writing. This break could be a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months. It depends on you. Then start editing once you’re fresh again.

For more on editing and publishing, see my How to Write and Publish a Novel page.

(via sohypothetically)

thinksquad:

DNA evidence has uncovered the identity of Jack The Ripper, and it’s none of the romantic suspects – such as the Queen’s surgeon Sir William Gull, or artist Walter Sickert.

The most infamous serial killer in history has been identified as a relatively underwhelming Polish madman called Aaron Kosminski, who was committed to a mental asylum at the height of the Ripper hysteria.

Kosminski was actually a suspect at the time of the murders, even named by Chief Inspector Donald Swanson in notes the policemen made, but as the myth and legend of the murders grew over more than 125 years, so too did the list of more fanciful suspects.

The breakthrough came when a scientist, using cutting-edge technology, matched DNA evidence on a shawl found at one of the crime scenes with descendants of Kosminski.

Dr Jari Louhelainen, a Finnish expert in historic DNA, was brought in to study a shawl found with Catherine Eddowes, the second-last ‘confirmed’ victim of the Ripper, whose body was discovered in Mitre Square on September 30.

Aaron Kosminski was born in the Polish town of Kłodawa, then part of the Russian Empire, in 1865. He emigrated to England with his family in 1881, moving to Whitechapel.

He set himself up as a hairdresser but it is clear that he was suffering psychological problems, with latter-day case notes saying he had been ill from 1885.

The murders attributed to Jack The Ripper began in 1888. Anywhere between five and 11 murders of women in and around the Whitechapel area have been linked to the Ripper.

The five relatively undisputed murders – of Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes and Mary Jane Kelly – happened between August 31 and November 9 1888. The 126th anniversary of Chapman’s murder is on Monday (September 8).

The police file on the murders also point to the mutilation deaths of Rose Mylett, Alice McKenzie, the ‘Pinchin Street torso’ and Frances Coles – Coles being the last to die in February 1891.

In February 1891, Kosminski was forcibly put in Colney Hatch Lunatic Asylum, and he remained in asylums until his death in 1919, aged 53.

While it can be argued that it is hardly conclusive evidence that Kosminski was the Ripper (the DNA of a Whitechapel resident on the belongings of a known Whitechapel prostitute merely proves Kosminski met Eddowes at some point), it does put Kosminski closer to a Ripper victim than any other suspect in the century-old case.

http://metro.co.uk/2014/09/07/identity-of-jack-the-ripper-finally-revealed-using-cutting-edge-technology-of-course-4859504/

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/jack-ripper-finally-been-revealed-4178080

http://www.itv.com/news/2014-09-07/has-jack-the-rippers-identity-finally-been-revealed/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2746321/Jack-Ripper-unmasked-How-amateur-sleuth-used-DNA-breakthrough-identify-Britains-notorious-criminal-126-years-string-terrible-murders.html

(via sohypothetically)